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20130323
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
on board basically. a deal that would avoid, for example, having to worry about raising the debt ceiling end of july, early august. is that at all doable? >> it is possible. i wouldn't go as far as saying doable now. but what i will say, the difference in approach now versus say two years ago when they tried this and it failed and it was, you know, almost the end of the world as the u.s. bumped up against the debt ceiling, the difference is they are going through what we call in washington regular order. everything is done in the open. i think that has lead to a different atmosphere on capitol hill where people know what's going on, they're voting on measures, and they're not waiting to see the white smoke from the white house when the president and house speaker and others are having private meetings that nobody is involved in. the fact that they didn't trust each other, then rank and file didn't trust them behind closed doors, that added to the problem. the fact it is happening in the open could help. >> at least the president is engaged in the so-called charm offensive, speaking with
, sequester, the debt ceiling, all of those issues seem to be moving out later into the year. so as a result the impediments that were slowing the economy down over the last couple of quarters we think will result in better economic growth. the equity market is starting to sense that. i think to some degree that is some of the reasons why the markets ignored washington and ignored sandy so far this year and is up 10% or so. >> that is why you have such a bullish forecast for the s&p. you are calling for it to end the year at 16.60. it is all going to play out pretty strongly. >> we think corporate earnings will chug along may increase about $108 full year for the s&p. we think we will get a little multiple expansion from 14 to 15 times as treasury yields continue to work higher. that will drive out of bounds and into stocks. we think the equity market ends up with a 15% to 20% positive return for the year. >> that is a good way to turn to stocks that are going to perform well. you have len on the big board as your top pick. you reported the blowout earnings this year. the stock has been on a
to be two-pronged. you are going to have a debt ceiling debate when funding for the government runs out. president and white house wants to have a deal with some kind of tax increase and house republicans do not want to include that in any kind of package. they don't want the debt increases limited. secondly, there is talk about a grand bargain to get a new budget in place. >> gregg: how do you handicap that? >> i think this is one of better chances we've seen in a while. >> gregg: why, because the president is paying attention to his poll numbers which is dropping considerably? >> i think he is paying attention to congress. first term he ran against them for reelection campaign. he didn't want much to do with congress. he didn't work with them or invited them up to the white house. this is the first time we have soon signs of reaching across the 16 blocks to capitol hill. i think house republicans have come to the point where they really see that the american public is sick of what i would call crisis fatigue. every three to five months there is some crisis in congress and go down to t
of the deal by extending the debt ceiling. because they wanted to make the democrats vote on a budget. lou: how can so many members of our senate continued to spend whatever and the like they have on these procedural maneuvers. >> that is basically what the senate does. >> there i go. >> constituency to get the house and the senate together. no presidential leadership yet for a grand bargain. no sense that we can reform the tax system and entitlements. perform defense and have a ratial rational and reasonable defense. >> why in the world is the president of the united states not moving forward with a budget that would be a blueprint to resolving those proposals? >> the words that seem to be operative here are cowardice or oppounism. it has to be one of the two. >> to do the wrong thing continually is not the act of a coward. lou: are you saying that the president is incapable of doing the right thing? >>'m comparing how talented this man is. >> why doesn't he apply that? >> you know, that turns out to be laughable. the odds ar empirically before him. you know, that is just unreasonable. >>
in arguments over raising the debt ceiling will begin. >> people on the east coast are seeing meteors. that large vibrant meteor shot through the sky about 5:00 our time. here is video. meteor over new york city that was posted on youtube. check it people who saw it the need your traveled from west to east and northeast sky. they have received hundreds of reports on it and more than 50 reports. pretty dramatic as you can see. >> there are sites to match people for dates so why not applicants with jobs is in the process is scientific with a mathematical algorithm the core. david louie explains how bright works. >> reporter: it's a universal complaint among job seekers. >> i put out five to six resumes a week. >> do you hear back from them? >> most of the time i do not. >> this era it makes a climate of frustration from for the applicant and too many for employers to review. >> they are check boxing the jobs and applying to thousands of jobs. >> steve believes he has the solution a site developed an algorithm that evaluates a resume and makes a score to identify candidates to interview.
for the upcoming battle over the next round of negotiations on the debt ceiling, which i think both republicans in the house and the democrats in the senate and the white house are going to say, you know, again try to find -- could they reach a grand bargain, any kind of bargain not only to raise the debt ceiling but bring down the deficit long term. the democrat budget, of course, talks about a big tax hike over ten years of about $1 trillion. republicans say they're not going to do that. they want to roll back obama care. these are the two outside extreme positions. that's where we're at now. going forward can they come together and find some middle ground? >> weigh in on that, lauren. is there really a chance for reconciling these two extreme budgets? >> i think david kind of nailed it here. when it comes to the budgets, they're just a little bit too far, but this budget process isn't a waste of time. i think it's promising that they went through regular order. this is something that the senate hasn't done. they haven't passed a budget this a long time. i think what we'll see is this may ope
debt ceilings to fiscal cliffs. we keep hearing the sky is falling. >> what it about trying to make the president look bad. you think republicans like this is hanging out there and they think if there's no apocalypse it will make the president look bad? >> i think they miscalculated, they thought the american people would respond a little more aggressively against the sequester than they actually had. i think that was part of the idea, they don't want to kick the can down the road they want to fight this. ultimately they'll come up with some issue that they can hold onto and say look we won, we forced the president to his knees but until that happens, this is what you'll see, continuous sequester and a president who is hanging out on a limb. >> bizarro world. >> what do the cuts do to people worried about the belt tightening, is there a risk that the economy absorbs it and you don't have a lasting effect? >> there's not a risk, there's an actuality, reality that $17 trillion economy can cut back on 1% of government funding over a nine-month period. the miscalculation wasn't on the b
a debt ceiling debate that's going to be coming in the next few months. while they passed two budgets they haven't gone through the whole process. we could continue with a number of stop gap measures keeping government from shutting down until someone comes to a big agreement. host: on our line for republicans, go ahead. caller: thank you sir for taking my call which really enjoy c-span. i don't get to watch it much due to the fact i'm in school monday through friday. i'm an american government teacher and have been for the last 19 years and i have a question the for your young lady. i would like her to define the word politico. that's the first question. number two, what is frightening for the student i face daily and have faced for the past 19 we now the fact that govern by party, we don't govern by the constitution. ealthcare not mentioned in the document. not expressly or interntly mentioned by the document. if washington would have thought it was important, it would have been in there. secondly resolutions as you mentioned are not binding and all it does is increase the burden o
with the debt ceiling back in 2011. half of our time between january and june, half of our time was not spent on ledge slayive business. in 2011, it was the fewest number of days we were in session since 1992 and it was coinciding with one of the events that created the highest level of policy uncertainty than any event in the last 20 years. that surpassed the wars, september 11th, just to name some major events. that debt ceiling debacle did more to disrupt the public's confidence in the integrity of the political process in washington. you have to make your elected officials accountable. you have social media. you can build an online community and you get a message multiplier. you can find out where your lawmakers are, are they in session five days a week? they should be working. these are things you can do right now. these are simple but concrete solutions. how can you deal with our ma
interesting we run back into the ceiling debt much later and that rolls up into the fiscal cliff 2.0 in how the government tempts to deal with it. so you may ask yourself we have a portion of the tax increases went through and who knows exactly what congress is going to but it's probably a pretty good guess that we get to the very last minute right before the march 1st effective gate date for the spending cuts and then we get some other short-term extension to add to this made for tv drama that they seem so fond of lately and you wonder where does it get us long term and how are we able to close the gap here the congressional budget office has looked at what they consider to be the most likely outcome of the ongoing negotiations which, is a marshal implementation of these spending cuts and what you see here are two lines. the top line is out lace as a percentage of gdp or government spending as a percentage of gdp and starting today and going out through the end of 2022 and this is a forecast for the next nine years and going below that is rather a new as a% of gdp and what you take way h
they ought to be taking recesses when they are facing a sequester frankly. the debt ceiling back in 2011. half our time in the senate between january and june, half of our time was not spent on legislative business. in fact in 2011 alone, it was one of the fewest number of days we've been in session since 1992 and here it was coinciding with one of the event that created the highest level of policy uncertainty of any event over the last 20 years, surpassing the wars, surpassing the financial crises, september 11th. just to name some major events. and that debt ceiling debacle did more to disrupt the public's confidence in the integrity of the political process in washington. so you have to make your elected officials accountable. have you social media, you can build an online community instantaneously and you get a message multiplier. by doing that you can find out where your law makers are. are they in session five days a week? they should be working. these are things you can be doing now. these are simple solutions but concrete ones. how can you deal with the issues of our day in two a
to be agreement in congress, but we are not there yet. we have a debt ceiling. while they passed to budgets, they still have not gone to the whole process. we could continue with these stop-measures to keep the government from shutting down until eight -- an agreement is made. , go ahead.ssee caller: i would like her to define the word "politico." americanught government for the past 19 years and we are not governed by parties. we do not covered by the constitution. example which one is not mentioned in the constitution. if madison and hamilton thought it was important and washington thought it was important, it would have been in there. resolutions are non- binding. all it does is increase the burden of debt of my students who are now in debt probably $50,000 already. they have not graduated from high school already. households are in debt to the tune of $150,000 -- host: you have given us a lot to work with. what level do you teach? caller: high school. 12th graders? caller: yes, sir, u.s. government. guest: host: if you go to our website, you will find information that could be helpful i
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)